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John Bowley Quested 14 December 1893 – 11 March 1948 Place of birth Cheriton, Kent, England Allegiance  United Kingdom Service/branch Aviation Years of service 1914 - 1919 Rank Major Unit No. 11 Squadron RFC, No. 48 Squadron RFC, No. 40 Squadron RFC Commands held 1 Aerial Gunnery Range, 2 Aeroplane Supply Depot, No. 79 Squadron RAF Awards Military Cross Croix de Guerre (France) Major John Bowley Quested was an English World War I flying ace credited with eight aerial victories, the most notable of which was over Gustav Leffers. Contents 1 World War I service 2 Postwar 3 References 4 Endnotes World War I service Quested was commissioned in November 1914. In April 1915, he began flying as an observer/gunner in 11 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps.[1] Quested became a pilot on the Royal Aircraft Factory FE.2bs of 11 Squadron, and scored his first aerial victory on 16 August 1916, driving a Roland two-seater reconnaissance biplane down out of control. On 2 September, he repeated and doubled the feat, driving down two Rolands. On the 15th, he destroyed an enemy fighter plane. A week later, he became an ace by shooting down and destroying an Aviatik two-seater.[2] On 20 December 1916, Quested drove an Albatros D.I down out of control. A week later, at 1115 hours, he supposedly destroyed another, killing the pilot. However, his observer identified it as a Nieuport 16; it seems a captured French airplane was being used against them. This seventh victim of Quested was German ace Gustav Leffers. In turn, Quested was forced down behind British lines by another German ace, Wilhelm Cymera, at 1230 hours.[3] On 27 January 1917, he drove an opposing fighter for his eighth victory; his final tally was three enemy planes destroyed and five driven down.[4] On 13 February, he was awarded the Military Cross.[5] The Croix de Guerre followed on 1 May 1917.[6] A crash in July 1917 ended Quested's flying career, although he continued to serve in nonflying command positions for the duration of the war.[7] Postwar Quested reputedly served in Germany and India. Differing reports have him commanding 79 Squadron in 1919,[8] or serving in 48 Squadron in Quetta that same year.[9] Later, he retired to Anglia to farm.[10][11] References Pusher Aces of World War I Jon Guttman, Harry Dempsey. Osprey Pub Co, 2009. ISBN 1-84603-417-5, 9781846034176. Endnotes ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/england/quested.php Retrieved on 1 August 2010. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/england/quested.php Retrieved on 3 August 2010. ^ Pusher Aces of World War 1. p. 49.  ^ Pusher Aces of World War 1. p. 49.  ^ (Supplement to the London Gazette, 13 February 1917) http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/29940/supplements/1543 Retrieved on 3 August 2010. ^ (Supplement to the London Gazette, 13 February 1917) http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/30043/supplements/4156 Retrieved on 3 August 2010. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/england/quested.php Retrieved on 1 August 2010. ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/england/quested.php Retrieved on 3 August 2010. ^ Pusher Aces of World War 1. p. 49.  ^ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/england/quested.php Retrieved on 3 August 2010. ^ Pusher Aces of World War 1. p. 49.  Persondata Name Quested, John Alternative names Short description Date of birth 14 December 1893 Place of birth Cheriton, Kent, England Date of death 11 March 1948 Place of death This biographical article related to the military of the United Kingdom or its predecessor states is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.v · d · e